Symbols everywhere

THE SYMBOLISM IN OUR PEACE SILK SCARF EXPLAINED
SUN
It stands for life, flourishing nature and is often associated with Spring rituals.
The sun has always been worshipped by ancient cultures as there would be no way to sustain life without it à Centre of humankind’s existence.
In Christianity, the sun stands as a symbol for Christ or Christ-like attributes.
Power, strength, force and clarity
It’s the yang, the masculine energy in most cultures.
Symbolic of the mind and intellect.
Also called the cosmic eye viewing out upon its dominion during the day, like the eyes of Zeus in Greek mythology.
Elements associated with it: Bronze, Gold, Diamond, Ruby and Topaz
Animals associated with it: Eagle, Tiger, Lion, Salamander, Horse, Rooster, Porcupine, Swan, Phoenix, Dragon, Bull.
Flowers associated with it: Lotus, Rose, Sunflower, Chrysanthemum
MOON 
Associated with the world of the dead
Moon phases stand for the cycle of life: Birth, death, rebirth, etc.
Represents the Yin and the feminine.
Following the symbolism of the Lunar Cycle as part of our spiritual devotions can be very fulfilling in developing a deeper connection with our planet, whatever is out there and ourselves:
New Moon:  New beginnings, fresh start, blank page.
Crescent Moon:  Intention, hopes, and wishes
First Quarter Moon: Challenges, decisions, action.
Gibbous Moon: Adjust, refine, edit.
Full Moon:  Signed, sealed, and stamped.
Disseminating Moon: Gratitude, sharing, enthusiasm.
Last Quarter Moon: Release, let go, forgive.
Balsamic Moon: Surrender, rest, recuperate.

 
OUROBORUS SNAKE
Ancient symbol depicting a serpent or dragon eating its own tail.
Originates in ancient Egyptian iconography.
Symbolize introspection, the eternal return or cyclicality, especially in the sense of something constantly re-creating itself.
Also represents the infinite cycle of nature's endless creation and destruction, life and 

 
WATER
Element of the unconscious, associated with intuition and emotion.
Symbolic of purity, fertility, life, motion, renewal and transformation.
The profound symbolism of water comes from its two vital qualities – it is essential for existence and it cleanses and purifies things by washing away impurities.
Its power of transition from liquid to solid and vapour also make it special and a symbol of metamorphosis & recycling.  
Water is an inter-connected energy flow between all living things.
TREE
metaphors for spiritual growth, they are wisdom keepers. Let us go into the different parts of a tree to explain:
Generally, trees are never about limitation but about generosity – they are ever-extending themselves to reach out for more and more. A spiritual lesson from them to us is to never be limited. Always branch out to expand awareness and spiritual growth. Branches and roots always find ways around obstacles.
The trunk: The tree bark protects the intricate system of circulation and energetic flow inside. It renews itself from the inside out – like our prime source of renewal must first be activated from within.
The roots: Serve as anchors, gripping tightly into Mother Earth and drawing from her various nutrients and water. Like the branches going further and further – metaphoric for our inner root systems of belief and spirituality. We must dig deep, to continue to grow and support ourselves with strong positive beliefs in order to insure upward mobility. Also, the roots are unseen, like our soul evolution occurs underneath superficial layers - it is sacred, tacit and anchors us in our lives.
The leaves: Usually carry the colour green, a colour notorious for healing, abundance, and vitality à also colour of the heart chakra which deals with inclusion, love, empathy, wealth, health and much more.
VULVA
The vulva is merged and slightly hidden into the leaves of the mangrove in our illustration.
This playful synergy highlights the interconnectedness of the heart and the sexual organ – love, vitality, abundance and so on.
The vulva symbolises reproduction, birth, life.
It goes through different stages in the life of a woman, from birth,childhood, puberty, menopause to post-menopause – it’s an ever evolving organ.
Some ancient religions and societies have worshipped the vulva and revered to the female as a goddess – many traditions inHinduism still do, referring to it as yoni. The yoni is a representation of the female deity Devi and is found in many temples as a focus for prayer and offerings.
In the Uruk period the ancient Sumerians, regarded the vulva as sacred and a vast number of their poems that are praising the vulva of Inanna the goddess of love, sex, and fertility, have survived. Even some clay models of vulvas were discovered from that time.
Mythical narratives of goddesses and heroines parting their thighs to reveal their sacred powers exist in most cultures worldwide.